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    Natural Stone Disclaimer


 
The contents of this page applies primarily to landscape pavers and dimensional stone and is a discussion of what you should expect regarding natural stone.

There is a saying in the stone industry, "There is a home for every piece of stone." Buying a crate of stone is a bit like buying a crate of apples. Each one is different, some are more "perfect" than others, but most of what's in the crate is usable. If an apple in the crate is bruised or has a bug hole in it, we cut the bad part off and use the rest. The same is true for natural stone. There will be some imperfections, but most projects require pieces to be cut, so your installer will set aside pieces with imperfections that can be used later for cutting and fitting. The scraps will come from the part of the stone with the imperfections that do not meet your individual level of acceptance. Other less-than-perfect pieces can be placed in areas of the project which are seen less.

Sometimes people purchase natural stone with unrealistic expectations that every piece will be identical. Unlike manufactured stone that comes out of a mold, natural stone is a product of nature. Consequently its physical appearance and characteristics exhibit the variability we typically see in nature. With natural stone those differences among stones are what you are paying extra for, and they should be appreciated as part of the natural beauty rather than as flaws. No two pieces will be identical, but when all of the different pieces are integrated into your project the differences will not be noticeable.

The problem with evaluating the quality and usability of stone is that each person has a different idea of the characteristics of what constitutes a satisfactory piece of stone. How much can the surface vary in color and texture? How big can a chip on the corner be before it's unacceptable? Can there be a color line through the stone? How many tool and quarry marks may appear on the surface before there are "too many"? Dimensional pavers are not perfect squares and rectangles, so how much can they be off before it's too much? These things are hard to measure and quantify. Consequently it is very important for you to inspect a pallet of the stone before you make your purchase. If you need stone that is more perfect that what you see, you will need to adjust your budget and purchase extra. What can you do with pieces left over from your project? Give them to friends or sell them on Craig's List.

The Formal Disclaimer:

Buyer acknowledges that stone is a natural substance formed within the earth, and that different types of stone, as well as individual stones within any given type may vary in color, texture, thickness, density, durability or fitness for a particular use or purpose. Because natural stone may chip, peel, flake, bleed, oxidize or otherwise deteriorate over time, all of these attributes should be considered when using stone, especially in any exterior application subject to moisture. Buyer acknowledges that Seller has no control over Buyer's selection or use of any stone, and that exposure to weather, installation techniques or preservative measures used by Buyer or its installer all may affect the long-term performance and durability of any stone selected and/or installed by Buyer. Square footage estimates per ton vary within each stone type. Stone must be inspected by Buyer and critically evaluated for any specific applications prior to installations, as Seller makes no warranties, express or implied, regarding the fitness of any stone sold to Buyer for any purpose. Buyer's purchase of stone from Seller constitutes Buyer's acknowledgment of the above, and acceptance of the risks inherent in the use and installation of this natural substance and a waiver of any and all claims which Buyer may have against Seller arising from the chipping, peeling, flaking, bleeding, oxidation, or other deterioration of this natural substance. ***

Below are photos showing some of the different types of imperfections common in natural stone:

A thin color line transects this paver:

Color line through stone.
This paver has a streak of fool's gold in it:

Color line through stone.
This layering is typical of hard sandstone:

French Vanilla Pavers
Limestone occasionally shows some layering:

French Vanilla Pavers
This shows a close-up of a chipped corner and edge:

French Vanilla Pavers
This is a close-up of a chipped corner:

French Vanilla Pavers
This is a close-up of a chipped edge:

French Vanilla Pavers
This shows a small bit of stone the sticks up:

French Vanilla Pavers
This stone has a dark patch:

French Vanilla Pavers
These stone vary in color:

French Vanilla Pavers